Employee Involvement Methods for Improving Performance & Work Attitudes

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    Culture

    • Employee engagement begins with a positive organizational culture. The culture of an organization is easily described as its personality. The organization's espoused culture is commonly communicated through its vision or mission statement. One organization might espouse a culture of honesty and communication, while another may place a greater value on profits. To increase employee involvement, it is essential that the organization's actual culture be in alignment with its espoused culture. Employees are far more likely to allow themselves to become engaged with a workplace that practices what it preaches than one that touts one set of values while following another.

    Communication

    • Opening the lines of communication within the organization to ensure employees have access to the information they need when they need it is another effective method of improving performance and work attitudes. Creating a communication culture in which employees feel comfortable sharing their ideas and issues with managers and supervisors gives workers a sense that they truly belong.

    Responsibility

    • Managers and supervisors must accept responsibility for their impact on the attitudes of their employees. In 2004, the National Bureau of Economic Research released a paper that cited managers as the main driver of employee attitudes in the workplace. Managers and supervisors who believe their workers have bad attitudes should examine their own role in creating those attitudes before they can expect to stimulate a change.

    Rewards

    • Rewards and recognition are essential to improving job performance and work attitudes. Eric Mosely, CEO of Globoforce, recommends building a "culture of appreciation" in which employees feel as though their contribution to the organization is valued. While rewards are vital, it is important for management to implement a meaningful rewards and recognition system designed to meet the needs of individual employees. For example, instead of choosing one specific reward for all workers, select a number of items and offer each employee the opportunity to choose. It also is important to present rewards and recognitions in a public format.

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